9 File Managers for Linux

Konqueror – Default file manager in KDE3, Konqueror was replaced by Dolphin in KDE4. Very powerful, Konqueror supports profiles, split windows, several view modes, plugins and much more features.
Official website

Krusader – Another powerful file manager for KDE, Krusader has an interface similar to Midnight Commander, starting by default with two panels (the so-called ‘twin panel’ mode).
Official website

Dolphin – The new file manager in KDE4, Dolphin aims to be easy to use and provides basic features for file management. Although the official homepage claims that Dolphin focuses on usability, I found it harder to use than Konqueror or Xfe, for example. But since I don’t use it much, I guess that’s just because I’m not used to it yet.
Official website

Nautilus – Default file manager in GNOME, praised by some and criticised by others, Nautilus has a simplistic interface, being powerful enough in the same time. Although currently it doesn’t support tabs, Nautilus includes lots of other useful features and it can be extended through scripts.
Official website

Xfe – A nice little file manager rich enough in features, with an intuitive interface, the X File Explorer is built with the FOX graphical interface toolkit. Full review here.
Official website

Thunar – Default file manager in Xfce, in my opinion Thunar is just like Nautilus in every way.
Official website

ROX-Filer – Although ROX-Filer has a minimal interface, it provides many features and configuration options.
Official website

PCManFM – Built in Gtk, PCManFM is clean and features tabs, which makes some users prefer it over Nautilus. Full review here.
Official website

Midnight Commander – File manager using TUI (Text User Interface) which means it doesn’t need X to run. I honestly never saw the point in using a file manager when in command line, but some prefer it over plain commands.
Official website

[ via Echoes ]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *